Eugene O'Neill Theatre

230 West 49th Street, New York, NY 10019

Directions & Box Office

  • Directions: By Subway, take the C/E to 50th Street, walk south on Eight Avenue and then turn left onto 49th Street. Or take the 1 to 50th Street, walk south on Broadway and then make a right onto 49th Street.
  • Entrance: 49th Street, between 8th and Broadway The Eugene O'Neill is located on the south side of 49th Street, between Broadway and Eighth Avenue.
  • Box Office Hours:
    Monday - Saturday:
    10am - 8pm
    Sunday:
    12pm - 7pm

Best Seats In The House

  • Seats: 1108

The extreme right and left sides at the very front of the orchestra will sometimes have only a partial view, depending upon the production. The seats in the front to mid orchestra are ideal.

Eugene O'Neill Theatre Seating Chart

Eugene O'Neill Theatre Seating Chart

Parking for Eugene O'Neill Theatre

The closest parking garages for Eugene O'Neill Theatre are located at:

Zenith Parking Garage
790 8th Ave, New York, 10019
(Enter on W 49th & 8th Ave)
212-581-8590
Redball Parking LLC
225 West 49th Street
New York, NY 10019
212-262-5450

The closest parking is not always the best as it often takes longer to park and retrieve your vehicle as fellow theatre goers have the same idea. A better choice of parking may be the second choice or further away by a couple of Avenues.

Additional Notes

Landlord: Jujamcyn Theaters

Official Ticketer: Telecharge

Notes: Named for the writer of classic plays The Iceman Cometh and Anna Christie.

Now Playing The Book of Mormon

  • Opened: March 24, 2011
  • Show Closes: Open ended
The Book of Mormon is a satirical and raunchy story about two young Mormon missionaries who travel to Uganda in order to share the Mormon religion, only to make up …more Get Discounted Tickets

Eugene O'Neill Theatre History

The Eugene O'Neill Theatre is named for one of America's most cherished playwrights, the man who wrote such classics as Anna Christie, The Iceman Cometh, Desire Under the Elms, and Long Day's Journey Into Night. However, when it opened in 1925, this theater was called the Forrest Theatre, after famed 19th century stage actor Edwin Forrest. Originally built by the Shuberts, the theater came under new ownership 20 years later and received not only a major renovation but also a new name: the Coronet. As the Coronet, it hosted a number of successful productions, including Arthur Miller's breakout work, All My Sons. The last Coronet production was a revival of Eugene O'Neill's The Great God Brown, and then, in November of 1959, the theater was re-named in honor of the playwright. The Eugene O'Neill Theatre's debut production was A Loss of Roses, by another great dramatist, William Inge. Continuing its association with writing legends, the theater was purchased by Neil Simon in the '60s and many of his hit plays, such as Last of the Red Hot Lovers, California Suite, Chapter Two, and even a revival of his musical Little Me, played here. Jujamcyn bought the Eugene O'Neill Theatre in 1982.

Eugene O'Neill Theatre Design

Architect Herbert J. Krapp designed the Eugene O'Neill Theatre, and with a seating capacity of approximately 1,100, it is a good mid-sized theater, especially suitable for larger plays or more modest musicals. Though the interior is very nice, the Eugene O'Neill's facade is nondescript, dull and mud-colored. The restrooms are, thankfully, quite large.