“The Elephant Man” Starring Bradley Cooper Is Delayed

The Broadway Run Is Pushed By A Month

Originally slated to begin performances on October 18, 2014 at the Booth Theatre, The Elephant Man has delayed its production until November 7, 2014.  Its official opening night will now be on December 7, 2014, with the limited engagement scheduled to conclude on February 15, 2015.  The delay was reportedly caused by a scheduling conflict.

This Will Be The Second Broadway Revivalbradley cooper elephant man

This 1977 play by Bernard Pomerance has been produced on Broadway twice before.  Its premiere was in 1979, for which it won the Tony Award for Best Play as well as the Tony Award for Best Direction of a Play.  There was then a revival in 2002, which ran for only 57 performances.  In any case, plans for the 2014 revival are well underway, with direction by Scott Ellis.  Scenic and projection design will be by Timothy R. Mackabee, costume design is by Clint Ramos, lighting design is by Philip S. Rosenberg, and sound design is by Drew Levy.

Cooper Played the Role at Williamstown

In the lead role of John Merrick will be film star Bradley Cooper, whose credits include Silver Linings Playbook (Academy Award nomination for Best Actor), American Hustle (Academy Award nomination for Best Featured Actor), The Hangover, The Place Beyond the Pines, and Wet Hot American Summer.  The cast of this revival will also include Patricia Clarkson as Mrs. Kendal and Alessandro Nivola as Frederick Treves.  Scott Ellis directed these same three actors in a 2012 production of the play at the Williamstown Theatre Festival.  Joining these three cast members for the Broadway revival will be Anthony Heald, Scott Lowell, Kathryn Meisle, and Henry Stram. elephant manThe Elephant Man is the story of a severely disfigured man in 19th century England, who travels the freak show circuit until he is noticed by a renowned physician.  Bradley Cooper will play John Merrick, the disfigured man.  Interestingly, this role is always portrayed without the use of any excessive makeup or props, but rather it is up to the actor to display the proper physicality to invoke the sense of disfigurement and awe.