Bye Bye Birdie Review

Bye Bye Birdie Broadway MusicalShow Summary
This musical theater classic follows what happens when popular Elvis-style rock ‘n’ roll singer Conrad Birdie is drafted into the army.

Our Recommendation
This is a great choice for a family looking for some good clean fun and who don’t want to see yet another Disney show. The production stars John Stamos (TV’s Full House) and Gina Gershon, and the score features classic songs like “Put On A Happy Face,” “Kids,” and “A Lot of Livin’ To Do”.

Foodies Unite: Epicurious Entertains New York

Epicurious Entertains New YorkSay what you like about New York, it has some of the best restaurants, most obsessed foodies and most diverse cuisine of just about anywhere. This week, “Epicurious Entertains New York” comes to town to prove the point. The event, which starts today (Sept. 30) and runs through Sunday, October 4, features demonstrations and celebrity-chef meals (both dinner and lunch) in a pop-up space near Union Square (837 Broadway at 18th Street). And in a city that’s not easily impressed, you will pretty much be wowed by the chefs that are appearing: Everyone from Daniel Boulud (Daniel; DB Bistro Moderne) and Mario Batali (Babbo) to Zak Pelaccio (Fatty Crab) and Paul Liebrandt (Corton).
Events include an homage to culinary innovation (Oct. 1, 11:30 am-3:30 pm) called “Intelligent Entertaining”; it features chefs and bartenders who are as much techno-geeks as they are chefs. October 3 brings “Cooking with Kids”: As an enticement, someone from Magnolia Bakery will be on hand. It’s strictly BYOK (Bring Your Own Kid.) Some of the events are sold out, so be sure to check (800-922-1691).
The culminating event? “Fatty Sunday: A Zak Pelaccio Lunchtime Feast” (12-7 pm). Pelaccio will whip up treats from his new restaurant, Fatty ‘cue, as football season kicks off.
What says fall better than strange edible infusions, five-course meals, and lots of smoked meat?
If you’re in New York, pretty much nothing.

A Steady Rain Opens On Broadway

A Steady Rain Broadway ShowThere’s A Steady Rain on Broadway, of the theatrical kind. The new play by Keith Huff is opening at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, where it is scheduled to play a strictly limited engagement through December 6. Although Huff is undoubtedly a fine playwright, the fact is that the big draw of this two-person Chicago cop drama is that it features two major movie stars, Hugh Jackman (X-Men, Wolverine, Australia) and Daniel Craig (Casino Royale, Layer Cake, The Golden Compass). Neither are new to the stage. Jackman’s big breakout in the theater world was his role as Curly in a London revival of Oklahoma! in the late ’90s, and he went on to win a Tony Award for his Broadway debut, the Peter Allen musical The Boy From Oz. Craig, known as the new James Bond on the big screen, did London stage work early in his career and was trained at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, but A Steady Rain marks his first appearance on Broadway.

Free Verse: Poets House Moves to Battery Park City

Poets HouseMaybe you haven’t picked up a book of poetry in a couple of years, or your last memory of trying to compose a poem was writing a Valentine’s Day limerick to your fourth-grade crush. Well, you can change all that, because as of last week, New York’s Poets House has a bigger, better, splashier new home in Battery Park City. (Ten River Terrace; 212 421-7920)
The 50,000 volume library and literary center, which was founded by poet Stanley Kunitz and arts administrator Elizabeth Kray in 1985, just re-opened in a new space by the water. The 11,000 square-foot space offers poetry lovers more than twice the area of the former Soho second-floor loft. It features a Children’s Room; multimedia archive; Reading Room (added bonus: fantastic views of the Hudson River); and an exhibition space.
The center offers more than 200 public programs a year, including workshops, lectures and readings; it has a poetry collection that includes books, journals, chapbooks and digital media. It’s a delightful resource for anyone interested in poetry, and wonderful memorabilia includes handmade Christmas cards by Robert Frost and a first edition of Dylan Thomas’ “A Child’s Christmas in Wales.”
The center has been granted rent-free use of the space for the next 60 years.

New York Musical Theatre Festival Begins

New York Musical Theatre FestivalIt’s NYMF-o-mania in midtown New York City starting today, as the New York Musical Theatre Festival kicks off its sixth year presenting a fresh slate featuring dozens of brand new musicals. The largest festival of its kind in the country, NYMF has quickly become the place to scope out new musicals. The festival always includes a wide range of productions, from spoofy type shows like Gay Bride of Frankenstein to more serious fare like the African-set Mo Faya. At the same time that the festival manages to give a platform to rising musical theater writers, it also attracts big name talent – as a result, many shows have already started selling out, so we’d advise looking into getting tickets sooner than later. In addition to the two dozen or so productions in the New York Musical Theatre Festival, there are also readings, concerts, and other special events that will appeal to musical theater fans. Find out more at www.nymf.org.

FiIm Buffs, Start Your Engines: The New York Film Festival Hits the City

An Old NY Film Festival PosterFilm lovers, rejoice: The 47th annual New York Film Festival is in the city. The Festival takes place at the newly spiffed-up Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center from September 25-October 11. (Call 212 875-5050 for information about purchasing tickets.)
The Festival offers film buffs, couples looking for a cool date night and the just plain curious a chance to see the breakout hits, indie films, small documentaries and foreign entries that pepper the more-than-two-week event. Some will make it to the mainstream; others will pop up at your local independent cinema or go straight to DVD.
Films include “Antichrist,” from the almost-always-controversial director Lars von Trier, about the repercussions of a tragic event on a couple; (Oct. 2; 9 pm; Oct. 3; 1 pm); “The Art of the Steal” (Sept. 29; 9:15 pm); a documentary about the famous Barnes collection of art and the foundation set up to protect it; and “Crossroads of Youth” (Oct. 3; 11 am), the oldest surviving Korean film (1934). It’s the story of a brother and sister who encounter life in the city; the film will have live musical accompaniment as well as a live offscreen narrator.
The Festival will end with “Broken Embraces” from director Pedro Almodovar, focusing on a blind screenwriter. It stars Almodovar muse Penelope Cruz, and will screen on Oct. 11 at 5 pm and 8 pm.
Created in 1969 to bring international films to an American audience, the festival screens around 28 movies and 12 shorts; it has no categories and no prizes are given.
It’s film for film’s sake, pure and simple.

Broadway Flea Market Takes Over Shubert Alley Today

Broadway Flea MarketOne of the most unique Broadway events of the year comes to Shubert Alley this Sunday, from 10am to approximately 6pm, and that is the annual Broadway Flea Market and Grand Auction. A fundraiser for Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS, the flea market features two streets full of tables where the cast, crew, and staff of Broadway shows and theater-related organizations hawk their wares. These items include standard fare such as show posters, old Playbills, and merchandise like mugs and t-shirts. More coveted items include autographed memorabilia, props and costumes actually used onstage, and even baked goods made by cast members of Broadway shows. (Tip: Get there as soon as the flea market begins in the morning to get a shot at nabbing the best stuff.) A large number of Broadway and television celebrities will also be signing autographs throughout the day, but be prepared to wait in line for a little while. The highlight of the event occurs in the mid-afternoon when some of the flea market’s most impressive items are auctioned off. The auctions typically include things like rare autographed posters, dinners with celebrities, and walk-ons for TV shows and Broadway shows. Shubert Alley is located in Times Square, between 44th and 45th streets, between 7th and 8th avenues.

Tommy Tune Designated Living Landmark

New York City will be honoring one of Broadway’s most renowned talents, Tommy Tune, in a rather unusual way on November 4. Tune will be designated as a “Living Landmark” by the New York Landmarks Conservancy, an organization that for over 35 years has been working to preserve the great architecture of New York. With the “Living Landmark” honor, the Conservancy has also been acknowledging some of the state’s most distinguished human contributors (past honorees include Lauren Bacall, Harry Belafonte, Whoopi Goldberg, and more). A nine-time Tony Award winner, Tommy Tune is an actor, director, and choreographer whose work includes Broadway musicals such as Nine, My One & Only, Grand Hotel, and The Will Rogers Follies.

Broadway Legend Tommy Tune To Be Named Landmark

Tommy TuneNew York City will be honoring one of Broadway’s most renowned talents, Tommy Tune, in a rather unusual way on November 4. Tune will be designated as a “Living Landmark” by the New York Landmarks Conservancy, an organization that for over 35 years has been working to preserve the great architecture of New York. With the “Living Landmark” honor, the Conservancy has also been acknowledging some of the state’s most distinguished human contributors (past honorees include Lauren Bacall, Harry Belafonte, Whoopi Goldberg, and more). A nine-time Tony Award winner, Tommy Tune is an actor, director, and choreographer whose work includes Broadway musicals such as Nine, My One & Only, Grand Hotel, and The Will Rogers Follies.

Bring It On To Become A Broadway Show

Bring It On Broadway MusicalBring It On: The Musical is now in the works. Set in the world of competitive cheerleading, the musical will have an all-star creative team, including composer Lin-Manuel Miranda (In the Heights), bookwriter Jeff Whitty (Avenue Q), composer Tom Kitt (Next To Normal), lyricist Amanda Green (High Fidelity), and choreographer Andy Blankenbuhler (In the Heights). The 2000 film of the same name spawned a whole franchise, and it seems that those movies have served as the inspiration for the forthcoming Broadway show, though the musical will not be using the plots from any of those movies.