Waiting For Godot Broadway Show Review

Show Summary
Nathan Lane and Bill Irwin star in this classic existentialist play about two men waiting for someone (or something?) called Godot.

Broadway Review
Though the plot to Waiting For Godot is simple, the play itself – which is full of humor and intriguing ideas – is anything but. Over the years, Samuel Beckett’s masterpiece has been interpreted a thousand different ways, and now audiences have another chance to try to decipher it in this top-class Broadway production, also starring John Goodman and John Glover.

Jude Law, Julia Stiles, and More Coming To Broadway Soon

New Broadway show announcements have been piling up lately, and some big ones came down the pike today. The Donmar Warehouse production in London of Hamlet, starring Jude Law as the angst-ridden Dane of the title, will be arriving on our shores in September for a limited 12-week engagement at the Broadhurst Theatre. A Los Angeles production of David Mamet’s play Oleanna starring Julia Stiles and Bill Pullman will come to Broadway in October with its stars in tow. Oleanna will play the Golden Theatre, just after it is vacated by long-time resident Avenue Q, which only recently announced its September closing. And award-winning actress Laura Linney will be returning to Broadway in January in the Manhattan Theatre Club premiere of Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Donald Margulies’ new drama Time Stands Still, which will play a limited run at the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre.

Nutty Professor To Become Broadway Musical

Rupert Holmes (Curtains, Say Goodnight Gracie, The Mystery of Edwin Drood) and songwriter Marvin Hamlisch (A Chorus Line, Sweet Smell of Success, They’re Playing Our Song) are working on a new Broadway musical based on the classic Jerry Lewis film comedy The Nutty Professor. Lewis himself will direct the production of this Nutty musical, which is aiming to hit Broadway in the 2010-2011 season. Jerry Lewis is no stranger to the stage, having starred in the touring production of the musical Damn Yankees in the ’90s. The 1963 movie The Nutty Professor, which Lewis starred in and co-wrote with Bill Richmond, is about Julius Kelp, a geeky genius who creates a potion that transforms him into smooth operator Buddy Love.

The Nutty Professor To Become Nutty New Broadway Musical

Rupert Holmes (Curtains, Say Goodnight Gracie, The Mystery of Edwin Drood) and songwriter Marvin Hamlisch (A Chorus Line, Sweet Smell of Success, They’re Playing Our Song) are working on a new Broadway musical based on the classic Jerry Lewis film comedy The Nutty Professor. Lewis himself will direct the production of this Nutty musical, which is aiming to hit Broadway in the 2010-2011 season. Jerry Lewis is no stranger to the stage, having starred in the touring production of the musical Damn Yankees in the ’90s. The 1963 movie The Nutty Professor, which Lewis starred in and co-wrote with Bill Richmond, is about Julius Kelp, a geeky genius who creates a potion that transforms him into smooth operator Buddy Love.

Irena, Accent, The Philanthropist, and August All Close on Broadway

A quartet of shows are having their final performances on Broadway today. Two of them, Accent on Youth (starring David Hyde Pierce) and The Philanthropist (starring Matthew Broderick), produced by Manhattan Theatre Club and Roundabout Theatre Company, respectively, have finished their limited runs. But Irena’s Vow and August: Osage County were open-ended Broadway runs that are only concluding now because of low ticket sales. August has had an unusually successful run for a Broadway play, having begun its highly acclaimed limited engagement at the Imperial Theatre in late 2007, then transferring to the Music Box Theatre so that it could enjoy a continuing run (winning the Tony Award and Pulitzer Prize for author Tracy Letts along the way). Unfortunately the show is closing shortly after Phylicia Rashad took over the major role of family matriarch Violet, a part that has already earned her raves from many of the audiences who have had a chance to see August in the last few weeks.

Alan Cumming and Evan Rachel Wood Cast in Spider-Man Musical

Some of the initial casting for the forthcoming Broadway musical Spider-Man Turn Off the Dark has just been announced. Alan Cumming (Broadway revival of Cabaret, The Threepenny Opera, Design For Living) will play Spider-Man‘s nemesis, the Green Goblin, also known as Norman Osborn. As previously rumored, movie actress Evan Rachel Wood (Whatever Works, The Wrestler) will play Peter Parker’s girlfriend Mary Jane. Spider-Man director Julie Taymor (The Lion King) worked previously with Wood in her film Across the Universe, and is currently working with Cumming on a film adaptation of William Shakespeare’s play The Tempest. More casting information for Spider-Man Turn Off the Dark should be coming out soon. The musical, which will be scored by rock band U2, is scheduled to begin performances at Broadway’s Hilton Theatre in February 2010.

Blithe Spirit Broadway Show Review

Show Summary
Noel Coward’s 1941 play Blithe Spirit is a witty comedy about a novelist who, after participating in a seance, finds that he is being haunted by his his dead first wife (much to the chagrin of his current, living wife!).

Broadway Review
This is a wonderful opportunity to see the marvelous Angela Lansbury (Murder, She Wrote, Gaslight) play a very wacky medium and to catch actor Rupert Everett (My Best Friend’s Wedding) being droll as ever live onstage. The production starts off a little slow, but once the ghostly shenanigans begin, it becomes increasingly hectic and hilarious.

Twelfth Night Officially Opens in Central Park Tonight

The Public Theater’s first Shakespeare in the Park production of the summer, Twelfth Night, opens at the Delacorte Theater in Central Park tonight. The play, which is one of the Bard’s most enduring comedies (and was last produced in the park in 2002), began performances on June 10 and will run through July 12. Although this production doesn’t officially open until this evening, the buzz on it during previews is some of the most positive word-of-mouth on one of the Public’s Shakespeare in the Park shows in years. Twelfth Night stars Anne Hathaway as Viola, a young woman who dresses up as a young man so that she can work for Orsino (Raul Esparza), the duke who is in love with mournful Lady Olivia (Audra McDonald), who in turn falls in love with the cross-dressing Viola. Also taking part in the wacky antics is Jay O. Sanders as Toby Belch, Julie White as Maria, Hamish Linklater as Sir Andrew, and Michael Cumpsty as Malvolio. The production is directed by Daniel Sullivan, and Brooklyn folk-rock group Hem has set Shakespeare’s many songs in the play to music.

After Eight Years, Statue of Liberty Crown to Reopen July 4th

The crown on the Statue of Liberty will reopen to the public for the first time since the terrorism attacks on September 11, 2001, when it was closed due to terrorism and safety concerns. Starting July 4, 2009, the crown of this iconic symbol of America will be accessible to 30 people at a time, with 10 people allowed to climb the stairs at a time.
The limited number is for security and safety reasons. This limit of 30 will continue for two years before closing again for renovations to make access safer and easier. The 12-story spiral staircase to the crown is already very narrow with low guardrails, which has raised concerns for fire safety as it is the crown’s single entrance and exit, violating all kinds of fire codes.
However, it is being reopened on July 4th, as a boost to New York City tourism and a gift to the city from Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar and the Parks Department. This is a victory for New York Representative Anthony Weiner, a Queens Democrat and prominent supporter. President Barack Obama also backed the idea, as the closure was originally enforced by the Bush administration. The formal announcement was made by Salazar on May 8, 2009 on NBC’s Today Show.

Former High Line Railway Gets Second Life As Public Park

The new High Line Park, an urban park in the sky, opened on June 9 to the public in New York City. It is constructed on top of the skeleton of a former rail system on building rooftops 30 feet above the ground. High Line Park is located on Manhattan’s West Side, running from Gansevoort Street in the Meatpacking District to West 20th Street in Chelsea, between Tenth and Eleventh Avenues.
The rooftop park was renovated and designed by James Corner Field Operations along with architects Diller Scofidio + Renfro. It has wooden lawns chairs, an LED lighting system, and landscape of green plants and grass among concrete. The park is accessible from Gansevoort Street, 14th Street, 16th Street, 18th Street, and 20th Street, and is open daily from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.
The original High Line, a 1.45-mile long steel railway, was built in the 1930s in an effort to remove freight trains from street traffic after too many accidents occurred between the two. No trains have run on the High Line since 1980. Nature took over after trains stopped running and became overgrown and untouched.
Friends of the High Line was founded in 1999, a non-profit community-led group advocating for the High Line’s preservation and reuse as a public park. The group gained city support in 2002 with a City Council resolution supporting the High Line’s reuse. Groundbreaking and construction started in April 2006.
A second section from 20th Street to 30th Street is projected to be ready in 2010, and a third and final section will come after that.