Jennifer R Jones

About Jennifer R Jones

With over 20 years experience in the Broadway field, including marketing, production, development and show investment, Jennifer R Jones is an all-around subject-matter-expert in the Broadway business. She lives in Manhattan with her husband and her iMac and tries to see at least five Broadway shows per week.

Broadway Stars Debuting New TV Pilots

Pilot Season for the Major Broadcast Networks

Every year, the major television networks such as CBS, ABC, NBC, Fox, and the CW go through a specific course of development to determine which new shows to add to their dockets. Referred to as Pilot Season, this is an intensive process that involves the submissions of thousands of elevator pitches, followed by calls for scripts, after which some are selected, and then actors flock from all over the country and world to audition for the parts. Due to the simultaneity of the process across networks, actors generally need to choose one show to ride out, which can be a gamble as the majority of shows do not get picked up, and therefore they would be sacrificing other opportunities for this one shot. However, the payoff can be great as television can be a great career boost for actors, including those who are already big stars in the theatre. Presently, though some shows are just beginning to premiere this season, networks are already entering the early stages of next year’s process, and some exciting Broadway names are headlining.

Already Picked Up: Sutton Foster Stars in “Younger” on TV Land

younger sutton fosterA new television show by the maker of Sex and the City, Darren Star, will premiere on TV Land on March 31, 2015. The show, Younger, stars Sutton Foster who came to fame through her Broadway performances in such musicals as Thoroughly Modern Millie, The Drowsy Chaperone, Anything Goes, and most recently, Violet. Her first leading role on television took place in 2012, when she starred in the ABC Family series Bunheads about a former Las Vegas showgirl turned small town ballet dance teacher. That show only lasted for one season of 18 episodes. Fortunately, Foster is getting another go at a TV leading gig this spring on TV Land. Younger, which also stars Hilary Duff (Lizzie McGuire), Debi Mazar (Entourage, Living with Fran), and Miriam Shor (Hedwig and the Angry Inch). The show is a single-camera, 30 minutes series about a 40 year-old mother having difficulty finding a job, so she gets a makeover and pretends she is in her 20s.

Idina Menzel in “Happy Time” and Megan Hilty in Untitled Judah Miller Projectidina menzel

Looking forward toward the upcoming pilot season, Ellen DeGeneres is producing a new series called Happy Time which stars Idina Menzel (Rent, Wicked, If/Then, Frozen). This half hour comedy series is written by Randi Barnes (Legends of Oz: Dorothy’s Return), and produced by DeGeneres’ company A Very Good Production. The show will most likely be shopped around this upcoming summer. Details about the show are not widely disclosed, but Happy Time revolves around a woman who is ready megan hiltyto stop pretending she is happy all of the time. Furthermore, Megan Hilty, who is best known for her starring role on the TV show Smash, and also for her Broadway performances in 9 to 5 and Wicked, is cast in an upcoming pilot to be written and produced by Judah Miller (American Dad, King of the Hill, The Tracy Morgan Show). In this presently untitled single-camera comedy, Hilty plays a Tony Award winning Broadway star who is still adjusting to her new role as a suburban mom. Along with her husband, an intellectual, she is thrust into a new world of competitive sports, as their son is a natural born athlete.

“Disgraced” Concludes Its Run

Last Performance March 1st at the Lyceum

disgraced posterWhen Disgraced began performances on Broadway on September 27, 2014, the production did not announce its closing date. After it opened on October 23, 2014, critics received it with warm praise. It was a New York Times Critics Pick, and Christopher Isherwood began his review with “Bon appetit!” However, despite these laudatory remarks, it never was a sell out at the box office. In January, it was announced that the last performance would be March 1, 2015. The play, written by Ayad Akhtar, won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, as well as the Obie Award and the Joseph Jefferson Award. The play had its New York premiere at Lincoln Center’s Claire Tow Theatre, through their LCT3 program to support new writing. Prior to that, it premiered in Chicago at American Theatre Company directed by Kimberley Senior, who has steered the production all the way to Broadway, thereby making her Broadway directorial debut.

A Mixed Cast of Originals and TV Starsdisgraced

The cast stars Gretchen Mol (the smoldering Madame of a brothel on Boardwalk Empire) in the role of Emily, an artist specializing in Middle Eastern imagery. She is married to a successful Pakistani-American lawyer, played by Hari Dhillon, a British actor, who made his Broadway debut in this role. Josh Radnor (from the TV show How I Met Your Mother) plays Isaac, the Whitney curator who is supporting Emily’s work. Karen Pittman plays his wife Jory; she made her Broadway non-understudy debut in this role, after having premiered the part at LCT3. Jory and Isaac are a mixed race couple who come over to dine with the protagonists, and the dinner conversation gets personal, dealing with concepts of race and identity. The fifth and final cast member is also making his Broadway debut: Danny Ashok plays Abe, Amir’s nephew. Unlike the very Western justice-based viewpoint of Amir, Abe is a bit more radical. He urges his uncle to help defend an imam who is under accusation of supporting Hamas.

Mediocre Box Office Performance

Despite accolades, praise, and acknowledgment that this was a truly great play and production, it still struggled to become a financial success. At the height of its weekly grosses, Disgraced brought in $512,646, which represents 65.92% of its gross potential. With a top ticket price of $198.00, the average paid admission was never over $85.87. And yet, in its highest earning week, the average paid admission was $78.87, so clearly discounting paid off to some degree for this production. At the Lyceum Theatre, Disgraced had a weekly gross potential of about $778,000. A straight play without Hollywood A-list stars or a recognizable film or brand name, Disgraced just couldn’t compete with all the other attractive fare on Broadway. The big blockbuster musicals or hot star on the marquee would surely beat out in mass the diehard locals and intellectuals who visit Broadway in order to see a Pulitzer Prize winning play on topics of interest regarding racial, religious, and national dynamics. And for those who haven’t read the literary press, that title isn’t very encouraging. Still, though this play may not have made profits, it did make history.

“The Heidi Chronicles” Begins Previews on Broadway

Starring Elisabeth Moss of “Mad Men” Fame

elisabeth mossOn February 23, 2015, The Heidi Chronicles by Wendy Wasserstein began previews in its first Broadway revival. The show originally played on Broadway from 1988 to 1989, when it won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama as well as the Tony Award for Best Play. This production is directed by Pam MacKinnon (A Delicate Balance, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?), and will officially open on March 19, 2015 at the Music Box Theatre. Elisabeth Moss, who is best known for playing Peggy Olson on AMC’s Mad Men, will star as the titular character Heidi Holland. This will be Moss’ second Broadway appearance, following her 2008 debut as Karen in David Mamet’s Speed-the-Plow. She also starred in the 2011 West End production of Lillian Hellman’s The Children’s Hour opposite Keira Knightley. Starring alongside Moss in The Heidi Chronicles is Jason Biggs (The Play What I Wrote, The Graduate, the American Pie movie franchise) as Scoop Rosenbaum, as well as Bryce Pinkham (A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder, Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson) as Peter Patrone. The play is lead produced by Jeffrey Richards and Jerry Frankel, and it is currently scheduled for a limited engagement to conclude on August 9, 2015.

A Feminist Manifesto, with Comedy and Heartheidi chronicles

The play is unique in the way it travels through time from Heidi’s high school years, up until her later adult years. Interestingly, the same male characters recur at different stages of her life, although she does not end up marrying any of them. Perhaps the most important to her is Scoop Rosenbaum (Jason Biggs), whom she first meets as a teenager, but any sense of budding romance is squashed as Scoop goes on to marry another woman, and then proceeds to cheat on her with many women. The other male closest to Heidi throughout her life is Peter Patrone (Bryce Pinkham), a gay pediatrician who acts as a best friend to Heidi throughout her trials and tribulations. While building a career as an art historian, Heidi tackles the issues of what it means to be a woman in the modern age, including the idea of having children. Ultimately, she realizes that she does not need to rely on a man in order to be a mother, and ends up taking the matter into her own hands through adoption. Though this play was originally written in the late 1980s, it is certainly still relevant today, and in fact it will be interesting to see how subtle aspects of the work play differently to a 21st century audience.

Paying Respect to Wasserstein Through Reviving Her Works

Throughout her lifetime, Wendy Wasserstein was considered one of the best playwrights of her generation, as well as a groundbreaking writer in terms of women being viewed on equal ground to men in the creative fields. Unfortunately, she died in 2006 at the age of 55 due to lymphoma. The night following her passing, Broadway dimmed the lights in her honor as is tradition for beloved Broadway figures. In addition to her seminal body of work, Wasserstein lived what she preached. In 1999, when Wasserstein was 48 years old, she gave birth to her first and only child, Lucy Jane Wasserstein. She raised her daughter on her own until the day she died, and she never revealed who the child’s father was. As illustrated in The Heidi Chronicles, Wasserstein’s life was testament to the fact that a woman can make her own life, even in the case of having children.

Broadway Show Ticket Sales Analysis w/e 2/22/2015

This week’s notable movements on Broadway are:

New Top Earning Shows: “The Audience” and “Fish in the Dark”

In the week ending February 22, 2015, two shows that have recently begun previews performed excellently at the box office. The Audience, which stars Helen Mirren in the role of Queen Elizabeth II, for which she won an Academy Award for also portraying in the film The Queen, brought in an impressive $1,048,473 this past week. Furthermore, it accomplished this feat in a week of only 7 performances. The previous week, it began previews but played only two performances; even then the figures seemed extremely promising. Still, this past week has proven that this show is a surefire hit with audiences, who are lining up to see this brilliant performance in the flesh. In addition, Larry David’s play Fish in the Dark, which David wrote and also performs in, brought in a weekly gross of $1,177,593. This is the first week in which the play had eight performances, and therefore it increased its weekly gross by $161,950. In the first two weeks of seven performances each, the play also performed very well at the box office, but now it has reached new heights. In any event, this proves that Larry David is a very exciting name on Broadway, and that audience members are thrilled to see him and his work.

An Overall Mixed Week on Broadway

This past week, about half of the running shows demonstrated an increase in sales, whereas the other half showed a decrease in sales. Across the board, there was therefore mixed movement on Broadway this week. Whereas The Lion King saw an increase of $214,415, bringing in a weekly gross of $1,940,457, the other usual mega hit Wicked barely increased at all, going up only $59,939 for a weekly gross of $1,646,631. On the other hand, another big earner, The Book of Mormon, saw a decrease of $99,705, bringing its weekly gross to $1,548,797. Other musicals that saw a decline in ticket sales were Honeymoon in Vegas, which is struggling to compete with a weekly gross of $799,136, representing 78.45% of its gross capacity. In addition, Cabaret declined by $154,143, bringing in a gross of only $337,003. It is doubtful how long that musical revival will last in such a competitive environment, especially as the new spring season is just gearing up. Surprisingly, the three shows that concluded performances in this past week all saw a decrease in sales. The Elephant Man, which ended performances on Saturday, February 21, 2015, went down by $90,713 for a final weekly gross of $1,022,479. That decline, however, is due to the fact that the week only included seven performances, so that Bradley Cooper could attend the Oscars. Furthermore, A Delicate Balance and You Can’t Take It With You, which both concluded their runs on Sunday, February 22, 2015, saw a decrease in sales in their final week.

The following are the Broadway ticket sales numbers for the week ending February 22, 2015:Broadway-Show-Ticket-Analysis-2-22-15-1

Show Name GrossGross TotalAttn %Capacity AvgPdAdm
A DELICATE BALANCE $432,887 4,327 67.44% $100.04
A GENTLEMAN’S GUIDE TO LOVE AND MURDER $635,905 6,442 88.78% $98.71
ALADDIN $1,546,267 13,785 100.01% $112.17
BEAUTIFUL $1,076,794 7,860 95.76% $137.00
CABARET $799,136 6,616 92.61% $120.79
CHICAGO $547,833 6,401 74.09% $85.59
CONSTELLATIONS $600,043 5,159 99.21% $116.31
DISGRACED $333,065 4,586 62.45% $72.63
FISH IN THE DARK $1,177,593 8,720 101.58% $135.05
HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH $541,166 5,403 76.65% $100.16
HONEYMOON IN VEGAS $337,003 4,476 47.66% $75.29
IF/THEN $603,920 7,788 74.26% $77.54
IT’S ONLY A PLAY $499,442 5,216 60.54% $95.75
JERSEY BOYS $734,939 7,709 78.47% $95.34
KINKY BOOTS $939,884 9,392 82.44% $100.07
LES MISÉRABLES $710,992 8,819 78.24% $80.62
MAMMA MIA! $578,257 7,157 76.73% $80.80
MATILDA $1,037,118 11,482 100.23% $90.33
ON THE TOWN $536,545 7,760 51.76% $69.14
ON THE TWENTIETH CENTURY $293,584 4,233 97.71% $69.36
THE AUDIENCE $1,048,473 7,411 99.04% $141.48
THE BOOK OF MORMON $1,548,797 8,745 102.54% $177.11
THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME $791,055 7,648 93.91% $103.43
THE ELEPHANT MAN $1,022,479 5,548 102.40% $184.30
THE LION KING $1,940,457 13,569 99.77% $143.01
THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA $829,721 10,114 78.77% $82.04
WICKED $1,646,631 14,771 96.52% $111.48
YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU $403,767 5,574 64.93% $72.44
Total $23,193,752 216,711 83.73% $104.57

Broadway ticket sales raw data are provided courtesy of The Broadway League. All other data, text, opinion, charts and commentary are copyright © 2015 nytix.com

“A Delicate Balance” Plays Its Final Performance

A Wildly Successful Beginning, Tapering Out

a delicate balanceWhen Glenn Close and John Lithgow began performances in this season’s revival of Edward Albee’s A Delicate Balance on October 20, 2014, ticketbuyers sprinted to the box office. When the show opened on November 20, 2014, critics were generally laudatory of the marvelous rendition directed by Pam MacKinnon, arguably the greatest contemporary interpreter of the works of Edward Albee. As such, in the first week of previews, the show brought in $884,596, which represented 102.25% of its gross potential. However, it never made it past the 100% mark in any other week. The next three weeks were also excellent, with the box office reaching in the high 90s of percentage of gross potential, and 100% of audience capacity. Soon, however, sales began to taper off slightly. Between November 18, 2014 and December 14, 2014, the show was still between 88% and 99% of audience capacity; however, percentage of gross potential was slightly lower, between 83% and 94% of the full potential. This shows that the production began to offer a limited number of discounted tickets. Most recently, as the run nears its end, the production has brought in sales in the low 50s of percentage of gross potential. The show plays its last performance on Sunday, February 22, 2015.

An Excellent Production, but a Competitive Seasona delicate balance

It is not clear exactly why the show began with such a strong start, but then lost steam as it continued to play throughout the run. Most likely, the show reached its saturation point with individuals who were particularly excited about Albee, or Glenn Close, or John Lithgow, or the play in particular. After many other shows began performances, some exciting musicals or other plays with big stars in the lead, there just weren’t enough audience members to sustain the packed houses as the winter season kicked in. The two plays that did manage to survive the cold season were It’s Only a Play starring Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick, and The Elephant Man starring Bradley Cooper. However, most other shows remained in the midrange of ticket sales, competing with the regular favorites and mega musicals. In any case, this production can consider itself a success, whether or not it enters profits for its producers (the recoupment information has not been made public). It is an achievement merely to mount such a great dramatic work on Broadway and attract enough audience interest to maintain a fairly healthy commercial run.

“You Can’t Take It With You” Closes

Final Performance Sunday, February 22nd

you can't take it with youOn Sunday, February 22, 2015, You Can’t Take It With You will play its final performance at Broadway’s Longacre Theatre. It began previews on August 26, 2014, and the official opening night took place on September 28, 2014. This comedic revival is directed by Scott Ellis, who also helmed The Elephant Man starring Bradley Cooper, which wraps up performances the day before. The play was written by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman, and original music was written for this production by Jason Robert Brown (Parade, The Bridges of Madison County). The play starred James Earl Jones as the patriarch, Grandpa Martin Vanderhof. Furthermore, Rose Byrne starred alongside him, making her Broadway debut. Additional roles were played by Fran Kranz (Death of a Salesman), Annaleigh Ashford (Kinky Boots), and Byron Jennings (Arcadia). This comedy, originally written in 1936, takes place during the Great Depression. It is also a timely revival for the New York theatre scene, as last season Lincoln Center put on a play called Act One, which dealt with the life and collaborative partnership of Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman.

Critical Praise, and Commercial Survivaljames earl jones

Upon its opening night on September 28, 2014, critics were generally pleased with You Can’t Take It With You. Ben Brantley from The New York Times said that the only problem might be the pain in your cheeks after smiling for two and a half hours straight. Robert Kahn of NBC New York praised the performances of James Earl Jones, as well as Rose Byrne who is known for her performances in TV’s Damages as well as the film Bridesmaids. David Rooney from The Hollywood Reporter enjoyed the play’s escapist pleasure, emphasizing a life well lived rather than one marked by success. On the other hand, Mark Kennedy from the Associated Press did not enjoy the references from the Great Depression, such as Eleanor Roosevelt, Calvin Coolidge, and the 48 States. Unfortunately, the concept of a farcical Broadway “laughfest” has died down since the 30s, and a comedy that was once thought hilarious may now come off as a glorified television sitcom. Nevertheless, this Pulitzer Prize winning play from 1937 managed to charm critics and audiences alike in 2015, which is no small achievement.

A Difficult Sell at the Box Office

Despite the overall laudatory response from reviewers, the box office was a tough sell for this play revival in light of the highly competitive season. The show’s highest weekly gross took place in the week ending October 19, 2014, when it brought in $680,921, which represented 87.4% of its gross potential. Still, it mostly hovered around the $400,000 to $500,000 marks, with the lowest weekly gross of $334,244, which took place just recently in the week ending February 8, 2015. Though the play has notable stars such as the esteemed James Earl Jones, the cutthroat competition proved a bit too much to allow this play to be a real hit on Broadway.

“The Elephant Man” Concludes Its Run

A Broadway Success, Closing One Day Early

elephant manOn Saturday, February 21, 2015, The Elephant Man plays its final Broadway performance. It has been running at the Booth Theatre since it began previews on November 7, 2014, and opening night took place on December 7, 2014. This revival of the 1977 play by Bernard Pomerance was directed by Scott Ellis, and has received rave reviews and excellent box office performance. The production was originally scheduled to conclude one day later, on Sunday, February 22, 2015; Sunday is a common closing night for Broadway shows. However, this particular Sunday also happens to be the Academy Awards, of which the star of The Elephant Man – Bradley Cooper – was nominated for two for the biographical war film American Sniper. Not only is this the third consecutive year in which Cooper has received an Academy Award acting nomination (the previous two were for Silver Linings Playbook and American Hustle), but this is the first time he is also being honored with the nomination for Best Picture, as he is also a producer on American Sniper. This was therefore a good enough reason for The Elephant Man to cancel their final planned performance, allowing Cooper to travel to Los Angeles for the Academy Awards. This is the second instance in which Cooper cancelled performances for an awards ceremony; the first was for the DGA Awards on February 7-8, 2015.

Next Up: London’s West Endelephant man

Following the huge critical and commercial success of the Broadway run, The Elephant Man with Bradley Cooper in the lead role will arrive at London’s West End this spring. It will begin performances at the Theatre Royal Haymarket on May 19, 2015, and is scheduled to run until August 8, 2015. It will be a transfer production also directed by Scott Ellis, and Bradley Cooper’s co-stars Patricia Clarkson and Alessandro Nivola will join the London run as well. This will actually be the third time that these four individuals will have collaborated on this piece; the first instance was at the Williamstown Theatre Festival in Massachusetts in summer 2012. It is remarkable that Cooper has the stamina to continue to play this physically demanding role, in which he transforms into a deformed man based off a real-life figure named John Merrick. Cooper portrays Merrick, as the play has been traditionally done, without means of any stage makeup, but rather by means of physicality alone. It is therefore testament to Cooper’s true acting chops to be able to maintain this role in a third incarnation, which not all actors known for their film successes would be able to do.

Excellent Box Office Sales

In the last week of reported sales, the week ending February 15, 2015, The Elephant Man brought in an impressive gross of $1,113,192. This was the sixth highest grossing show that week, and by far the highest grossing straight play. It was only beat out by musicals, specifically The Lion King, The Book of Mormon, Wicked, Aladdin, and Beautiful: The Carole King Musical. This eight performance week followed a six performance week in which Cooper took off two shows to attend the DGA awards, causing the production to cancel those performances. Therefore, there is intense demand for this show as it nears its closing performance. After all, it will be a bit more difficult for New York theatregoers to catch the show in London.

Broadway Show Ticket Sales Analysis w/e 2/15/2015

This week’s notable movements on Broadway are:

Two New Shows: “The Audience” and “On The Twentieth Century”

In the week ending February 15, 2015, two new shows began previews on Broadway. The first, On the Twentieth Century, began performances on February 13, 2015, and played four times in this first week. Starring Kristin Chenoweth and Peter Gallagher, this musical revival with book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green, and a score by Cy Coleman, is produced by the Roundabout Theatre Company at their American Airlines Theatre. In the first four performances, it had mediocre box office performance, bringing in $228,661 which represents 56.95% of the show’s gross potential that week. With an average paid admission of $80.04, the show filled up 96.5% of the seats, which shows a fair amount of discounting. The next night, The Audience began performances on Valentine’s Day, February 14, 2015, at the Gerald Scheonfeld Theatre. Starring Helen Mirren in the role of Queen Elizabeth II, whom she won an Academy Award for portraying in the film The Queen also written by Peter Morgan, brought in a huge audience and box office response. In the first two previews, the show brought in $331,101, which is 111.21% of the gross potential. With a top ticket price of $293.00, and an average paid admission of $153.22, the show had standing room only with no discounting whatsoever. This is testament to the popularity of Helen Mirren, especially in this acclaimed role, along with excellent producing by the Brits who brought the show over the Atlantic.

An Overall Excellent Week of Box Office Sales

Of the 28 shows that had performances in the week ending February 15, 2015, all but one experienced an increase in box office from the week before. That show, Constellations, saw a decrease in sales of $39,530, bringing in a weekly gross of $491,055, which is not too bad at a gross potential of 71.75%. As for the rest of Broadway, every single show increased in ticket sales. One major reason may be that this week included Valentine’s Day, which was conveniently on a Saturday night. Not only is Broadway an excellent idea for date night, but the weekend positioning opened up the opportunity for Valentine’s associated dates to take place in five separate performance slots. The top earning shows were, as expected, The Lion King with a gross of $1,726,042, The Book of Mormon with a gross of $1,648,502, Wicked with a gross of $1,586,692, Aladdin with a gross of $1,489,612, and Beautiful which brought in $1,132,369. Excellent sales were also seen by The Elephant Man starring Bradley Cooper, with a weekly gross of $1,113,192. That show is one week from closing, and has also been offering less than full performance weeks due to Cooper’s schedule (last week they only played six), causing intense demand for this show during its limited engagement.

The following are the Broadway ticket sales numbers for the week ending February 15, 2015:Broadway show ticket sales analysis week ending 2/15/15

Show Name GrossGross TotalAttn %Capacity AvgPdAdm
A DELICATE BALANCE $491,763 4,799 74.80% $102.47
A GENTLEMAN’S GUIDE TO LOVE AND MURDER $642,010 5,769 78.98% $111.29
ALADDIN $1,489,612 13,770 99.90% $108.18
BEAUTIFUL $1,132,369 7,548 91.96% $150.02
CABARET $975,224 7,178 100.48% $135.86
CHICAGO $593,437 6,884 79.68% $86.21
CONSTELLATIONS $491,055 5,173 99.48% $94.93
DISGRACED $351,175 4,647 63.28% $75.57
FISH IN THE DARK $1,015,643 7,630 101.58% $133.11
HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH $635,303 5,656 80.24% $112.32
HONEYMOON IN VEGAS $491,146 6,092 64.86% $80.62
IF/THEN $687,134 8,669 82.66% $79.26
IT’S ONLY A PLAY $541,427 5,715 66.33% $94.74
JERSEY BOYS $679,472 6,569 66.87% $103.44
KINKY BOOTS $1,012,786 9,370 82.25% $108.09
LES MISÉRABLES $669,499 7,610 67.51% $87.98
MAMMA MIA! $562,438 6,921 74.20% $81.27
MATILDA $945,588 9,976 87.08% $94.79
ON THE TOWN $552,450 7,385 49.26% $74.81
ON THE TWENTIETH CENTURY $228,661 2,857 96.52% $80.04
THE AUDIENCE $331,101 2,161 101.08% $153.22
THE BOOK OF MORMON $1,648,502 8,749 102.59% $188.42
THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME $767,648 7,014 86.12% $109.45
THE ELEPHANT MAN $1,113,192 6,300 101.74% $176.70
THE LION KING $1,726,042 13,447 98.88% $128.36
THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA $721,008 8,056 62.74% $89.50
WICKED $1,586,692 12,583 86.95% $126.10
YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU $412,057 5,167 60.19% $79.75
Totals $22,494,432 203,695 82.44% $108.80

Broadway ticket sales raw data are provided courtesy of The Broadway League All other data, text, opinion, charts and commentary are copyright © 2015 nytix.com

Jon Stewart to Leave “The Daily Show”

Growing Restless, and Ready to Move On

Jon-StewartOn the Tuesday, February 10, 2015 episode of Comedy Central’s The Daily Show, Jon Stewart announced that he would be retiring from the position of host that he has held for the past 17 years. His contract with the network is up in September, but he explained that he may leave before that, as early as July, or after that, as late as December. In any case, he will not stick around for the notorious Daily Show election coverage in the 2016 election, entitled Indecision 2016. Not long after he took the mantle on January 11, 1999, Stewart made a huge name for himself through covering the 2000 election, when the concept of Indecision election coverage began. Since that time, he has defined himself as the go-to liberal correspondent, even if he is often considered a mock host, rather than a real host. In any event, he undeniably blurred the line between “real” news and “comedy” news in this era of increasing political cynicism and declining idealism. His decision to depart stemmed from a sense of growing “restless”; he said that America deserves better than even a somewhat restless host of The Daily Show. The only plans he specified was to spend more time with his family – specifically, to eat dinner with them on a school night, which is something he has not been able to do throughout his career.

What the Future Holds – for Stewart, and for the Daily Showjon stewart

Stewart did not make clear what his specific future plans are, although they could range from Hollywood directing to entering the realm of actual politics in Washington. He made his foray into film writing and directing last year with the only semi-successful Rosewater, for which he took a hiatus from hosting The Daily Show for three months. The film is not his usual comedic style; it is based on a memoir written by Iranian journalist Maziar Bahari involving his imprisonment in 2009. Whether or not this indicates that Stewart intends to pursue more directing opportunities, it does hark to a new effort to express his interest in current affairs through a lens other than his particular brand of comedy. All along, he has clearly cared about the issues he covered. His popularity stemmed from the fact that he was not mocking for the sake of mocking, but rather because he was not afraid to take a stance on issues of clearly marked importance for him and his staff. Certain online outlets have even been tossing around the idea of Stewart running alongside Hillary Clinton as Vice Presidential candidate in 2016, although he has not mentioned anything himself to this end. As for The Daily Show, it will continue on with a new host. Stewart has managed not only to position himself as a force to be reckoned with among the late-night competition, on a basic cable station no less, but he has also been able to build a legacy that will continue on without him, however difficult that is to imagine at the present moment.

Who Might Succeed the Legendary Jon Stewart?

It is too early to know for sure what direction Comedy Central intends to take The Daily Show in the absence of Jon Stewart, but a few likely contenders stand out from the rest. The main question is whether the producers will hope to keep The Daily Show in a similar tone and style to the past 17 years, or whether they will try to reinvent it with a completely different personality. In any event, one obvious choice would be John Oliver, who presently hosts his own HBO show Last Week Tonight that is very similar in tone to The Daily Show. However, he may be lured back to Comedy Central, as indicated by the fact that Oliver took over from Stewart for two months while he filmed Rosewater. Another idea is Aasif Mandvi, a Daily Show insider who would continue the show in a similar vein. Another in-house idea is Jessica Williams, who the film Hot Tub Time Machine 2 predicts will host in the year 2025, and who would set a precedent for a female, African American host. Another female candidate is Amy Poehler, who recently completed her run on Parks and Recreation, or perhaps Amy Schumer or Sarah Silverman. An outside-the-box individual would be Joel McHale, who might not be as inherently political. Two other comedians who might be considered are Patton Oswalt and Ricky Gervais.

 

“The Audience” Begins Previews

Helen Mirren Stars as Queen Elizabeth II

the audienceOn Valentine’s Day, February 14, 2015, The Audience began previews at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre. The play, written by Peter Morgan and directed by Stephen Daldry, premiered in the West End’s Gielgud Theatre almost exactly two years ago. It was a huge success, winning several awards including the Olivier Award for Best Actress for Helen Mirren. In June 2013, the production participated in the National Theatre’s NT Live programme, in which it was broadcast live to cinemas around the world. This broadcast broke records, bringing 80,000 viewers in the UK and another 30,000 in North America. The success of this production convinced the producers, Matthew Byam Shaw, Robert Fox, and Andy Harries, to mount it on Broadway, with the same director and several original cast members, including Helen Mirren (Queen Elizabeth II), Geoffrey Beevers (the Queen’s equerry), Michael Elwyn (Anthony Eden), Richard McCabe (Harold Wilson), and Rufus Wright (David Cameron). The play is scheduled for a limited engagement to run until June 28, 2015, with opening night taking place on March 8, 2015.

“The Queen,” and the Story of “The Audience”helen mirren

This production marks the second time writer Peter Morgan and actress Helen Mirren have collaborated on a work surrounding the life of Queen Elizabeth II. Released in 2006, Morgan wrote the screenplay for a film entitled The Queen directed by Stephen Frears, in which Mirren also starred as Queen Elizabeth II. For this performance, Mirren won both the Academy and BAFTA Awards for Best Actress. This is following her success as the title character in the television series Elizabeth I, for which she earned both the Emmy and Golden Globe Awards for her performance. The enormous success of the stage version The Audience has led not only to this Broadway transfer, but in addition a West End revival starring Kristin Scott Thomas at the Apollo Theatre, just two years after the West End premiere, to run concurrently with the Broadway production. The Audience refers to the weekly meetings the Queen was said to have with all former prime ministers from the start of her reign in 1952. The cast therefore includes actors portraying John Major, Gordon Brown, Harold Wilson, Winston Churchill, Anthony Eden, Margaret Thatcher, David Cameron, and Jim Callaghan. The play is a fictional portrayal of these meetings, with each prime minister confessing their deepest thoughts and feelings to the queen in private conversation.

Cast and Creative Team

In addition to Helen Mirren, as well as original cast members Geoffrey Beevers, Michael Elwyn, Richard McCabe, and Rufus Wright, the show will feature Dylan Baker as John Major, Judith Ivey as Margaret Thatcher, Anthony Cochrane as Cecil Beaton, Dakin Matthews as Winston Churchill, Rod McLachlan as Gordon Brown, and Elizabeth Teeter as Young Elizabeth. The scenic design is done by six-time Tony winner Bob Crowley, and the lighting design is by Rick Fisher, a two-time Tony winner. Furthermore, sound is by Tony winner Paul Arditti, and Paul Englishby did the music. The producers, Matthew Byam Shaw of Playful Productions, Robert Fox, and Andy Harries, also produced the original West End run.